@whataboutparis

September 14th, 2011

J. Daniel Hull

Corporate Lawyer. Lobbyist. Fixer. Traveler. Writer.

Partner, Hull McGuire PC

Author of the What About Paris? / What About Clients? law blog

Today we’re tweeting with @Whataboutparis, the online persona of Dan Hull: int’l lawyer and “father” of the Slackoisie Movement

Two corrections: It’s the Anti-Slackoisie Movement, Lance. I am the Mother. @ScottGreenfield is the Father. Got that?

  1. @Whataboutparis, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @Whataboutparis?
    WAP? is just the Twitter version of What About Clients? which started in 2005. Has been 5 or 6 writers off and on since that time.
    -
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    It’s Fun. Client industries include manufacturing, transportation, energy. Most (90%) long-standing. A few public figures, writers.
    -
  3. What types of work do you do for those clients?
    Clusters of work for each: in’l corp. tax, IP, environmental, labor, cross-border disputes, federal courts, straight-up lobbying.
    -
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    The Costs of Litigation. In B-2-B disputes especially, we need more Arbitrations Done Right & new concept of what “Winning” is.
    -
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    You ask GC/client rep what he/she Really Needs. 2. Then you just Shut Up. 3. You Listen.
    -
  6. Sounds about right. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Representation of German co. sued by Spanish co. building steel mill in rural Kentucky with Atlanta arbitration under Ohio law.
    -
  7. Wow. Why do your clients hire you?
    Most “hires” = repeat business. But my guess: they first come & stay because we think lawyering is not about the lawyers. Ever.
    -
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Litigation. In a Recession, you’d expect it. But it is not that much more than usual.
    -
  9. You’ve built a thriving int’l practice w/out setting up outside the US. Is that the right business model for all?
    No. You need very energetic lawyers who (1) want to “work abroad” & (2) could do that at almost any Western firm. Not 4 everyone.
    -
  10. OK. Would you do the same again today? Or are the costs too high, the risks too great, the law too different?
    Great question. We worked internationally/nationally before that was cool. Am sure we’d try to enter market. Not sure if we would.
    -
  11. Your firm has been part of the Int’l Business Law Consortium. What is it? What’s it mean for your clients? For you?
    IBLC “unbundled” lots of legal talent & gave even largest clients more choices abroad. 80+ firms in major cities around the globe.
    -
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    Varies. But I don’t use the word “lawyer” until I have their attention. Even sophisticated users of lawyers think we’re Wankers.
    -
  13. How do you market your int’l law practice? To whom? Did you always do it that way?
    We research thoroughly & pitch 4 new targets a year. If we get work from 2 inside of 18 months from first meeting, that’s success.
    -
  14. Your blog, What About Paris?, is many things to your readers. What is it to you?
    Mainly fun. And to pitch a few ideas: art of the client, working “in the world”, cultural literacy/wholeness, lawyering as hard.
    -
  15. OK, I gotta ask: what’s the Slackoisie, and why should they matter to the rest of us?
    The Slackoisie thinks Work is About Them–not about Buyers, Customers, Clients. The Slackoisie doesn’t matter. Just avoid them.
    -
  16. :-) Let’s switch gears now: What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    For decades now the Wrong People have been going to American law schools. Schools attract mainly “nice, smart” people. Not enough.
    -
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    1. Bigger & ultra-efficient in-house depts. 2. GC jobs more coveted than partnership. 3. Non-lawyers doing things lawyers now do.
    -
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Hard question. Most likely I’d work as either a Travel Writer or a Talent Agent (authors, actors).
    -
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    Seriously, I’d be very honored if folks around me said I made them do 2 things: (1) Feel Alive, and (2) Think On Their Own.
    -
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Travel, Read, Run, Do Stuff Outdoors. I love water. Been a fisherman my whole life–but took up fly fishing late. I love Europe.
    -
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Legal skills/reasoning=10% of what great lawyers have/use. Use Everything you have. Don’t play by “the rules”. Think on your own.
    -
  22. And the last question of our “longest” interview: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    For decades the vast majority of folks (i.e., 90%) who’ve attended U.S. law schools should not have attended. Don’t be among them.

Solid advice. Thanks much for tweeting with us (twice!); was great to get to know you and your practice better

PS Sorry I couldn’t end on an “up” note. But we do need the right people/personality types to become lawyers. :)

Indeed. And it’s good advice.

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@DavidMorganLLB

June 23rd, 2011

David Morgan

Employment Lawyer and Accredited Mediator

Partner, Burness LLP

Today we’re tweeting with @DavidMorganLLB, UK employment lawyer, accredited mediator, and one of The Lawyer’s Hot 100 for 2010

  1. @DavidMorganLLB, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @DavidMorganLLB?
    Hi. I’m an employment law partner and head of the dispute resolution department @BurnessLLP. I’m an accredited mediator too.
    -
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    @BurnessLLP is a full service commercial law firm with offices in Glasgow and Edinburgh, Scotland
    -
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Mainly large employers UK-wide. Commercial and public sectors. We’re big in media, retail and leisure
    -
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Challenge of keeping up-to-date with developments in a fast-moving field: Age discrimination and retirement are hot topics
    -
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I ask to visit their workplace for a tour. It’s so important to understand how their staff work, so I can shape my advice
    -
  6. That makes a lot of sense. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I defended an employer from protective award claims following redundancies. Value circa £1M (Big for #ukemplaw!) 1/2
    2/2 There were multiple union-backed claims. High stakes. We successfully resolved them at judicial mediation in London
    -
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    I’m told responsiveness and client focus sets us apart @BurnessEmplaw. Relationships are important to #HR professionals
    -
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    2 years ago – redundancies. Last year – Tribunal claim surge. This year – more positive: projects, training and deal support
    -
  9. How is social media affecting employer / employee relations in the UK? Is the law evolving in response?
    Most clients now embrace it. But, for some, still a fear-factor as #HR see how it can go wrong by employee misuse at work
    -
  10. Indeed. Your firm is part of the Employment Law Alliance. What does that mean for your clients? For your firm?
    Hugely important. ELA gives us a global reach to ‘best in breed’ employment lawyers around the world ~ http://t.co/6uA2D8K
    -
  11. How has the economic crisis “changed the game” with respect to employment law? Is it changed for good?
    Redundancies etc. raised the profile/ importance of our practice area. UK Govt now proposing employment law reform 1/2
    2/2 Flipside is (as in other practice areas) economics mean that clients are managing legal spend and doing more themselves
    -
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    “I’m a job law expert”… That usually gets the party started! *sarcastic tabloid face*
    -
  13. :-) You recently began blogging @ Defero Blog (http://bit.ly/kwo8Ye). Why did you start? Are you meeting your goals?
    Yes. I find the style of blogging liberating: colloquial and great way to get your personality across in opinion pieces
    -
  14. Besides blogging and Twitter, what other Web 2.0 tools do you use to market your practice? How effective are they?
    I’m a major proponent of LinkedIn. I run a LI Group for #HR professionals ~ http://t.co/JY48bYm >400 members and rising!
    -
  15. Congrats! Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Yes. My team and I have picked up 5 new client instructions thru LinkedIn. @BurnessLLP uses Twitter to recruit too 1/2
    2/2 And we launched a free Social Media Policy initiative thru the LI Group. Sent this to >100 new contacts/ target clients
    -
  16. Innovative use of LI. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Thanks. Tackling the competing interests of a diverse age demographic and addressing work/life balance and flexible working
    -
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Competition from external investment in BigLaw via ABS. More knowledge sharing amongst profession & clients. Virtual offices
    -
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I grew up in Bermuda, so maybe something in shipping or insurance. Oh … or a superstar DJ ;-)
    -
  19. :-) How do you want to be remembered?
    “Scotland’s leading employment lawyer” #noplaceformodesty #RIP
    -
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    My 2 young kids keep me on my toes most of the time! + I’m a huge reggae fan (esp. 70’s/80’s roots, dub and early dancehall)
    -
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Keep your skills fresh with research and pro bono. Train in mediation and negotiation skills.
    -
  22. That brings us to our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Law isn’t everything. Learn about business and soft skills – presentation, negotiation (& sales!)… Enjoy being a student!

That’s useful advice. Thanks very much for the interview today. I enjoyed learning more about you and your practice

Thanks Lance. I enjoyed it too. Great format. Thanks for giving me the platform.

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@MShermanEsq

June 16th, 2011

Michelle Sherman

White Collar and Social Media Law Attorney

Special Counsel, Sheppard Mullin

Author at Social Media Law Update blog

Former Los Angeles County Assistant Public Defender

Today we’re tweeting with BigLaw trial / social media attorney and former LA Country Ass’t Public Defender @mshermanesq

  1. @mshermanesq Welcome to 22 Tweets and thank you for joining us today. Tell us, who is @mshermanesq?
    A Calif. native, Smith College undergrad, UCLA law grad, litigation atty, writer and speaker on social media legal issues
    -
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    Complex business litigation, and social media legal consulting to businesses – if they are on Facebook, they want to talk to me
    -
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Mostly medium size to large businesses, including government contractors
    -
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue on the minds of those clients?
    Resolving business disputes cost efficiently w/a great result for the co. & its shareholders. No one benefits from long litigation
    -
  5. Indeed. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I am always available to them, don’t hesitate to call me w/any question, concern. My job is to take most of the worry off of them
    -
  6. Am sure they appreciate. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Getting a criminal case dismissed 4 an innocent man who had gone thru the Midnight Mission rehab/job program http://t.co/MZ48sfG
    -
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    They know I am smart, will work tirelessly 4 them, get good results, and be invested in their companies like they are
    -
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Litigation – it is generally the most active practice area in a firm especially in slower economic periods like we are in right now
    -
  9. How does your experience as Assistant Public Defender early in your career help your clients today?
    Being a public defender sharpens trial skills. Dealing w/bad facts often & winning, only sharpens outside the box litigation skills
    -
  10. What will be the next battleground in social media law? Who should be concerned?
    Privacy and whether companies r following their terms of use, and protecting the private info that they gather from their users
    -
  11. That’s definitely an issue of concern…. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    “Have u heard of Facebook? I am the person who helps businesses w/the legal issues for being on FB & having employees who r on it”
    -
  12. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    About 8 mos ago, providing useful info, staying more current w/news & legal developments, & connecting 2 people w/related interests
    My objectives have stayed pretty much the same once I became active. I received great advice 4 my Twitter activity from @changesq
    -
  13. You blog at Social Media Law Update (http://t.co/Alfp0TG). Who do your write it for? Why should they read it?
    Target audience is businesses who want a non-legalese discussion of social media legal issues & practical suggest’ns from a SM user
    -
  14. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Biggest benefit has been people finding me = invitations 2 speak, journalists quoting me, a book in the works & a monthly column
    -
  15. Pretty big benefits indeed. What does your firm leadership think about your active online presence?
    They are very supportive of my online presence, & w/out my social media blog at the firm, I would not have made it this far
    -
  16. That’s great. Let’s switch gears a bit now. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    The shrinking of the legal market, less jobs & opportunities for new attorneys. I don’t see this as a temporary state of affairs
    -
  17. What then will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    That is one crystal ball that is very foggy to me. My hope is that alternative dispute resolution will be used more, and early on.
    -
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    A career counselor, social worker, journalist, chef, food writer – I am doing what I love and dabbling in all of the above
    -
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    I would like to be remembered as a great tennis player, but since that is not likely to happen, I will settle 4 being a nice person
    -
  20. :-) What do you do when you’re not working?
    See movies, visit w/friends, cook, hike w/my dogs, go to the theater, try a new restaurant, take a spinning or pilates class, blog
    -
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Use social media to network with as many people as possible, become involved in bar association and legal groups, and don’t give up
    -
  22. And the final question of today’s interview: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Use social media to network w/as many people as possible, become involved in bar assn & legal groups, and find time for internships
    ABA sections and other legal groups are very receptive to law students who want to get involved early.

Good, consistent advice. :-) Thanks very much for tweeting with me today; I enjoyed getting to know you better

Thank you! I enjoyed myself and appreciated the thought you put into your questions.

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@HyperionLaw

May 31st, 2011

Cynthia Gilbert

Entrepreneurial Patent Attorney

Founder of Hyperion Law

Author of the Hyperion Law Blog

-

Today we’re tweeting Boston IP lawyer, passionate technologist, and founder of her own law firm @HyperionLaw

  1. @HyperionLaw, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @HyperionLaw?
    I’m a technologist, early adopter/geek, patent attorney. I passionately do outstanding work for clients I really believe in.
    -
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    It’s a radically different law firm focused on translating complex patent-ese into strategic business advice for tech companies
    -
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    I love working w/ emerging tech companies – any company with software tech, eg 2 computers & internet cloud, is right up my alley!
    -
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Understanding case law’s impact on software #patents & how to draft claims satisfying legal reqs while remaining useful to business
    -
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Patents are a critical tool – or tragic waste of $. Let’s discuss business goals to understand whether you benefit from filing one!
    -
  6. Interesting. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    A diabetes co had new glucose tools for useful, fun data interaction; it was satisfying to help them go from hard- to soft-ware IP!
    -
  7. I’ll bet it was. Why do your clients hire you?
    An experienced, personable attorney & unabashed geek w/ solid tech background, I keep us focused on business benefits of IP
    -
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Software #patents for tech companies with some friends-and-family or angel funding. It’s what I love so I hope it remains typical :)
    -
  9. You spent 5 years in a big firm before starting your own. What led you that decision? Are you meeting your objectives?
    Normal fee & firm structures reduce/kill interaction between experienced attys & clients. I saw a different way. Totally successful!
    -
  10. That’s great! How are your small / med-sized tech company clients doing in this economy? Is the crisis over for them?
    If you’re cash-constrained, I suspect there’s always a crisis! But these clients are adaptive and smart; they create ways to survive
    -
  11. What’s the next big frontier of IP law? Who will be most affected by it?
    The biggest battle is always over growing fees. A new biz trying to preserve IP options will find it harder to afford key advice.
    -
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    “I help companies protect their world-changing technology via strategic use of IP. And run a radically different law firm to do so.”
    -
  13. Nice. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    2008. I wanted to continue developing relationships w/ favorite clients. Now I also want to get to know others working w/ tech cos
    -
  14. You blog at Hyperion Law (http://bit.ly/mMg8lK). Who do your write it for? Why should they read it?
    Anyone who has to deal w/ US software #patents: CxO, GCs, entrepreneurs. I provide useful & jargon-free info, which is hard to find!
    -
  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Absolutely. One of my clients hired me after reading my posts on Quora; others decide to hire me when they read the blog.
    -
  16. Congrats on that. Let’s change gears now: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    We *could* tell clients we see their biz realities and will revamp the biz of law to forge even closer ties with them. But will we?
    -
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Cynically, I suspect it will look much the same as it does today! Some going w/ tried & true; some working creatively w/clients.
    -
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    An astrophysicist or an anthropologist. Or maybe an anthropologist who studies humanity’s obsession with the universe ;)
    -
  19. :-) How do you want to be remembered?
    As someone who lived and loved passionately and joyfully, gave back to the community, and was fun to be around.
    -
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I read fascinating non-fiction, check out new restaurants with my friends, travel the world with my husband, and spoil our two cats.
    -
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Take the time to do some serious soul searching about what you really want and gather info on how to get it. Don’t despair!
    -
  22. And our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Talk to many lawyers, get as much work experience in a law practice as you possibly can; work hard to understand the path you’re on

Great advice. Thank you very much for today’s interview. I enjoyed getting to know you and your practice

Thank you! I really enjoyed the discussion!

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@ljanstis

May 24th, 2011

Laurie Anstis

Employment Law and Business Immigration Lawyer

Associate at Boyes Turner

Author of the legal blog Work/Life/Law

-

Today we’re tweeting UK employment and business immigration lawyer, blogger, podcaster and budding drummer @ljanstis

  1. @ljanstis, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @ljanstis?
    Thanks Lance. I’m mainly an employment and business immigration lawyer in the @btemplaw group of @boyesturner
    -
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    @boyesturner is mid-sized commercial firm based in Reading, and won Best Regional Firm in last year’s British Legal Awards
    -
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Mainly mid- to large-sized employers
    -
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Last year: legal (and expected) for employers to force employees to retire at 65. This year: it’s not. That’s a big deal.
    -
  5. Indeed. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Usually how to spell my name. It doesn’t bother me, but I get asked it all the time.
    -
  6. First time I’ve seen that answer…. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I acted for employee in one of the first UK whistleblowing claims. He won >£250k, one of largest ever awards in those days
    -
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    I’m experienced, practical, committed to their work, and I don’t pick fights for the sake of it.
    -
  8. A good trait to have… What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Women claiming equal pay with men (or the other way round). Not typical, but big over the past few years
    -
  9. Does the need for UK biz immigration practice get smaller as EU gets bigger? How is your practice evolving due to that?
    No. New member states typically have some kind of restriction on movement of workers for a transitional period …
    … plenty to advise on there. Current gov policy is anti-biz imm and makes it difficult to get good results for clients.
    -
  10. You spent time in-house before moving into private practice. What does that experience mean for your clients today?
    It means I know that legal problems can often be overcome by looking at the practical issues.
    -
  11. Interesting perspective. What’s it like sitting on the other side of the bench, as a part-time employment tribunal judge?
    It’s harder work than it sometimes looks to a tribunal lawyer – but good to be able to see both sides of the story.
    -
  12. I image that’s helpful to you and your clients. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    “Employment lawyer” is usually enough.
    -
  13. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    Just over a year ago – on the basis of trying it and seeing what happens. That’s still the plan for now.
    -
  14. You blog (Work/Life/Law: http://bit.ly/dQZzMJ) and host podcasts for your firm. Who are they for? Why should they care?
    Blog – for anyone interested in emp law. They should care because there are some interesting posts (and comments) there …
    … Podcasts – for busy HR managers. They shld care b/c its a free & easy way to keep up to date, and sometimes entertaining
    -
  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Referrals – yes. Engagements – occasionally.
    -
  16. Nice that it’s paying off. Let’s switch gears: What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    How to respond to competition from people or organisations who don’t hold traditional legal qualifications.
    -
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Most legal services delivered by large organisations, with a few smaller firms in specialised niches.
    -
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    *long pause* I’d sort of like to be a cook/chef – but only on certain defined conditions that bear no relation to reality
    -
  19. :-) How do you want to be remembered?
    Aaaaaargh – I have no idea *immediately books long retreat to find purpose of life*
    -
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Not much at the moment, but in quieter times I grow fruit and veg and play guitar
    -
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Keep your knowledge and skills up to date by working on voluntary/pro bono basis (e.g. http://www.thefru.org.uk/)
    -
  22. And our final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Make sure you have more than just a legal qualification to offer potential employers – e.g. biz experience, language skills

Great advice. Thanks very much for tweeting w/me today. I enjoyed learning about you and your practice

Thanks Lance – its been fun.

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@tsolignani

April 26th, 2011

Tiziano Solignani

Family Law Attorney

Blogger

Author of Guida alla separazione e al divorzio

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Today we’re tweeting w/ @tsolignani: Italian lawyer, writer, blogger, dad, geek, Apple user

  1. @Tsolignani, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @Tsolignani?
    I was born in 1969 in Modena, Italy, where I currently live and work. I like to innovate the practice of law whenever I can
    -
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    A small multipractice firm, with around 12 atty’s, located in the sorroundings of Modena, powered by Apple and Ubuntu pc’s
    -
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Several. I like family law, but also traditional estate cases and generally matters where new technology is involved.
    -
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting your clients?
    Well, I guess you cannot find a single one. When hiring a lawyer, people would just like to know whether or not their …
    candidate could be able to handle their issues, which are always different, as a matter of fact …
    we don’t care so much about specialization: trying to be clever, brilliant and able to work together are better skills l
    -
  5. Interesting perspective. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Again, people just wanna know 3 things: whether you can handle their issue, how much time and money it’ll takes…
    So, this I what I usually tell them, then they have to accept my fee and other conditions and eventually we start…
    Whenever I can, most of the time, I do flat fees, so that people can exactly know the cost in advance. They like it.
    -
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    The italian code of conduct forbid to mention people you worked for as a lawyer. So that I cannot tell names. But one …
    of the most interesting experiences I had was being expert witness before the Crown Court, in the UK, into an extradition…
    case requested by the italian government, where the court denied the extradition as for my advice
    -
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    It’s up to them and it’s always different. Someone wants a «young» firm, someone else a lawyer one can email or DM …
    on twitter. Some others are Italian but live abroad and need a lawyer in the country. There really are many cases.
    -
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    I guess family law and, yes, it’s typical, but, again, beware family could embrace every branch of the law: think …
    f.i. to a divorcing couple who owns a corporation whose main assets are intellectual goods; it’s a divorce, but you …
    surely would need to work with an IP lawyer.
    -
  9. Indeed. How has personal (family) law in Italy changed over past ten years? What do those changes mean for your clients?
    Not as much as the society did and there would be really many things to change. Other european countries, such as Spain…
    and France did the innovation we missed, f.i. in marriages, allowing homosexual couples, but there would be much more
    -
  10. And how is the legal profession evolving in Italy? Do you see similar challenges as we do in the US (eg fixed fees)?
    Unfortunately, the legal profession in Italy is not evolving at all: rather it is getting worse day by day, due to …
    several reasons, such as judiciary system inefficiency, huge numbers of practitioners and many others …
    fixed fees: a law was enforced about that and some laywers like me do fixed fees, but the most still do not
    -
  11. Change is hard everywhere…. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I know many lawyers create an «audio logo» to spend in such cases, but I prefer not to mention my work while partying …
    when someone insists, I talk about what I do, which is not necessarily the legal profession, but maybe a book or article
    -
  12. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    3 years ago. When trying some new «net toy», my aim is just to have fun and satisfy my curiosity. But I have to say …
    twitter later did the trick for me. I use it everyday, have fun and many a good clients found me over there
    -
  13. You blog at http://bit.ly/dUDVl1. Who do you write it for? Why should they read it?
    For the common people, not for other lawyers. They can read to understand some basic notion and principles of the law
    -
  14. You mentioned clients finding you on Twitter: can you quantify the new engagements you’ve got from Web 2.0?
    Well, it is far for getting near my core business but it is promising and worth keep working on it
    -
  15. Tell us about “Guide to Separation & Divorce.” It’s a difficult subject. How do you make it less so for your clients?
    If there’s something we lawyers exists for, if any, is explaining the law to common people in an effective way. We have …
    change our language and literally translate in simpler terms what we are used to think in a more complicated form, but …
    I guess it is worth it. A lawyer is a good one only if he or she can communicate with everyone and turn simple what is not
    -
  16. Very well put. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    The fab 5? 1 get hired 2 do the work 3 get paid 4 try to save some money from bills and taxes 5 still keep smiling
    -
  17. :-) What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    We Italians live in an idle country where, when something changes, often gets worse. I have no idea, I just know I have …
    2 children and I hope neither of them gets to be a lawyer, there are many more funny and interesting things to do, as yet
    -
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I adore writing and sometimes I think about trying some short stories or even a novel, but I do not think I ever will :-)
    -
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    As a man with whom you could talk to and get some answer, some advice, some suggestion or even comprehension. A man who …
    helped someone, sometimes.
    -
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    As of today, mostly playing with my children. But I like «creative idling» too and «practice» whenever I can
    -
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    First off: choose whether you still want to practice or not. There are many other interesting things to do and where you …
    you can earn the same or even more money. If you decide to stay a lawyer, then prepare to do much more the marketing side
    -
  22. And our final question of the interview: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Try to get the best from the school experience and, once out, choose very carefully the career, maybe trying with stages

Very good advice, for both groups. Thank you for tweeting with us today; I enjoyed learning about you and your practice

I have learned so much too. Thank you for interviewing me. Have a nice day.

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